Is GDP the same as wellbeing?

Wellbeing: A different factor from GDP

Wellbeing itself may be defined as an individual, workplace or wider economic issue. Many of us viewing our health and wellbeing as inherently personal, but it is actually something both business and the government are increasingly looking into for mutual gain. Looking into wellbeing might address many more of the inherently complex factors associated to determining whether a workforce or economy is growing positively rather than just looking at GDP alone. Money on its own does not buy wellbeing.

GDP (Gross domestic product) is an economic value that sums up the market value of a given basket of goods. (If we are being technical, the OECD defines it as “an aggregate measure of production equal to the sum of the gross values added of all resident and institutional units engaged in production (plus any taxes, and minus any subsidies, on products not included in the value of their outputs.”) GDP has been used as a measure to determine standard of living.

Are you part of the evolution of workplace wellbeing?

GDP and Subjective wellbeing

Traditionally policy makers focussed on GDP growth as a means to identify raises of quality of life and wellbeing. However, these policy makers are increasingly focussing on a more subjective notion of wellbeing (Subjective Wellbeing “SWB”). A large reason for this is because people are more mindful that health and wellbeing it is not about only the wealth of a nation but its inherent happiness. In short, there is an increased realisation that one size does not fit all.

The OECD(2013) defines wellbeing as including “all of the various evaluations, positive and negative, that people make of their lives, and the affective reactions of people to their experiences”. Wellbeing is less about how comfortable you are from an economic sense, but it is much more about psychological mental states and reactions and the effects therefrom.

Developing a wellbeing strategy at home, work and beyond.

Given that health is biopsychosocial in nature (that is to say there is a physical, mental and environmental side to it) it is not unreasonable to think that effects in wider wellbeing may also lead to wider health care issues and challenges.

Connective Chiropractic’s role in empowering wellbeing at work and home

At Connective Chiropractic we believe that prevention is just as important (if not more important) than dealing with the effects of negative health. Whilst we are, of course, able to directly help some people to achieve their health care goals in our clinic through the provision of Chiropractic care, where required, we have also positioned ourselves to offer so much more. We are proud to champion our Empowering Wellbeing Community to better educate themselves of steps they can take to improve their wider health and healing.

Focussing on empowering more subjective wellbeing may not only improve the life of individuals, workplaces and communities. It may also help to improve wider economic environments through better equipping people to make informed health care choices of their own before health issues arise. Whether it be as simple as increased exercise, balancing diet choices or reducing stress, increasing focus on our wellbeing individually, at work and as a nation, can only be a good thing.

Find out about how Connective Chiropractic may help you

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